CAS No.50-28-2 Estradiol

Estradiol

Identification
Name Estradiol
CAS Registry Number 50-28-2
Synonyms BETA-ESTRADIOL-16,16,17-D3;17BETA-ESTRADIOL-16,16,17-D3;(+)-3,17β-estradiol;(17b)-estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-3,17diol;(17β)-estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-3,17diol;.alpha.-Oestradiol;.beta.-Oestradiol;17-.beta.-Estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-3,17-diol
Molecular Structure Estradiol   50-28-2
Molecular Formula C18H24O2
Molecular Weight 272.38
mp: 178-179 ℃(lit.)
Hazard Codes: Details
Risk Statements: 60-61-45-63
Safety Statements: 53-22-36/37/39-45
RIDADR: 2811

CAS 50-28-2 Wiki / 50-28-2 MSDS

Estradiol
The chemical structure of estradiol.
A ball-and-stick model of estradiol.
Names
Pronunciation /ˌɛstrəˈdl/ ES-trə-DYE-ohl[1][2]
IUPAC name
(8R,9S,13S,14S,17S)-13-Methyl-6,7,8,9,11,12,14,15,16,17-decahydrocyclopenta[a]phenanthrene-3,17-diol
Other names
Estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-3,17β-diol; 17β-Estradiol
Identifiers
CAS Number
  • 50-28-2 YesY
3D model (JSmol)
  • Interactive image
ChEBI
  • CHEBI:16469 YesY
ChemSpider
  • 5554 YesY
DrugBank
  • DB00783 YesY
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.022
KEGG
  • D00105 YesY
PubChem CID
  • 5757
UNII
  • 4TI98Z838E YesY
Properties
Chemical formula
C18H24O2
Molar mass 272.38 g/mol
Magnetic susceptibility (χ)
-186.6·10−6 cm3/mol
Pharmacology
ATC code
G03CA03 (WHO)
Routes of
administration
Oral, sublingual, intranasal, topical/transdermal, vaginal, intramuscular or subcutaneous (as an ester), subdermal implant
Pharmacokinetics:
Bioavailability
Oral: <5%[3]
Protein binding
~98%:[3][4]
• Albumin: 60%
SHBG: 38%
• Free: 2%
Metabolism
Liver (via hydroxylation, sulfation, glucuronidation)
Biological half-life
Oral: 13–20 hours[3]
Sublingual: 8–18 hours[5]
Topical (gel): 36.5 hours[6]
Excretion
Urine: 54%[3]
Feces: 6%[3]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Estradiol (E2), also spelled oestradiol, is a steroid, an estrogen, and the primary female sex hormone. It is named for and is important in the regulation of the estrous and menstrual female reproductive cycles. Estradiol is essential for the development and maintenance of female reproductive tissues such as the breasts, uterus, and vagina during puberty, adulthood, and pregnancy,[7] but it also has important effects in many other tissues, including bone, fat, skin, liver, and the brain. While estrogen levels in men are lower compared to those in women, estrogens have essential functions in men, as well. It is found in most vertebrates and crustaceans, insects, fish, and other animal species.[8][9]

Estradiol is produced especially within the follicles of the female ovaries, but also in other endocrine (i.e., hormone-producing) and nonendocrine tissues (e.g., including fat, liver, adrenal, breast, and neural tissues). Estradiol is biosynthesized from cholesterol through a series of chemical intermediates.[10] One principal pathway involves the generation of androstenedione, which is converted into estrone by aromatase and then by 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase into estradiol. Alternatively, androstenedione can be converted into testosterone, an androgen and the primary male sex hormone, which in turn can be aromatized into estradiol.