CAS No.60-29-7 Diethyl ether

Diethyl ether

Identification
Name Diethyl ether
CAS Registry Number 60-29-7
Synonyms
Molecular Structure Diethyl ether   60-29-7
Molecular Formula C4H10O
Molecular Weight

CAS 60-29-7 Wiki / 60-29-7 MSDS

Diethyl ether
Skeletal formula
Ball-and-stick model
Diethyl Ether Electron Rendering
Names
IUPAC name
Ethoxyethane
Other names
Diethyl ether; Dether; Ethyl ether; Ethyl oxide; 3-Oxapentane; Ethoxyethane; Diethyl oxide; Solvent ether; Sulfuric ether
Identifiers
CAS Number
  • 60-29-7 YesY
3D model (JSmol)
  • Interactive image
ChEBI
  • CHEBI:35702 YesY
ChemSpider
  • 3168 YesY
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.425
KEGG
  • D01772 YesY
PubChem CID
  • 3283
RTECS number KI5775000
UNII
  • 0F5N573A2Y YesY
Properties
Chemical formula
C4H10O
Molar mass 74.12 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Odor Dry, sweetish odor[1]
Density 0.7134 g/cm3, liquid
Melting point −116.3 °C (−177.3 °F; 156.8 K)
Boiling point 34.6 °C (94.3 °F; 307.8 K) [2]
Solubility in water
6.05 g/100 mL[3]
Vapor pressure 440 mmHg (20°C)[1]
Magnetic susceptibility (χ)
-55.1·10−6 cm3/mol
Refractive index (nD)
1.353 (20 °C)
Viscosity 0.224 cP (25 °C)
Structure
Dipole moment
1.15 D (gas)
Thermochemistry
Specific
heat capacity (C)
172.5 J/mol·K
Std molar
entropy (So298)
253.5 J/mol·K
Std enthalpy of
formation (ΔfHo298)
-271.2 ± 1.9 kJ/mol
Std enthalpy of
combustion (ΔcHo298)
-2732.1 ± 1.9 kJ/mol
Pharmacology
ATC code
N01AA01 (WHO)
Hazards
Main hazards Extremely Flammable, harmful to skin, decomposes to explosive peroxides in air and light[1]
Safety data sheet See: data page
External MSDS
R-phrases (outdated) R12 R19 R20/22 R66 R67
S-phrases (outdated) S9 S16 S29 S33
NFPA 704
Flammability code 4: Will rapidly or completely vaporize at normal atmospheric pressure and temperature, or is readily dispersed in air and will burn readily. Flash point below 23 °C (73 °F). E.g., propaneHealth code 2: Intense or continued but not chronic exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury. E.g., chloroformReactivity code 1: Normally stable, but can become unstable at elevated temperatures and pressures. E.g., calciumSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
4
2
1
Flash point −45 °C (−49 °F; 228 K) [6]
Autoignition
temperature
160 °C (320 °F; 433 K)[6]
Explosive limits 1.9-48.0% [4]
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
LC50 (median concentration)
73,000 ppm (rat, 2 hr)
6500 ppm (mouse, 1.65 hr)[5]
LCLo (lowest published)
106,000 ppm (rabbit)
76,000 ppm (dog)[5]
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 400 ppm (1200 mg/m3)[1]
REL (Recommended)
No established REL[1]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
1900 ppm[1]
Related compounds
Related Ethers
Dimethyl ether
Methoxypropane
Related compounds
Diethyl sulfide
Butanols (isomer)
Supplementary data page
Structure and
properties
Refractive index (n),
Dielectric constant (εr), etc.
Thermodynamic
data
Phase behaviour
solid–liquid–gas
Spectral data
UV, IR, NMR, MS
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
YesY verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

Diethyl ether, or simply ether, is an organic compound in the ether class with the formula (C
2
H
5
)
2
O
. It is a colorless, highly volatile flammable liquid. It is commonly used as a solvent in laboratories and as a starting fluid for some engines. It was formerly used as a general anesthetic, until non-flammable drugs were developed, such as halothane. It has been used as a recreational drug to cause intoxication.