CAS No.90-12-0 1-Methylnaphthalene

1-Methylnaphthalene

Identification
Name 1-Methylnaphthalene
CAS Registry Number 90-12-0
Synonyms 1-METHYLNAPHTHALENE;ALPHA-METHYLNAPHTHALENE;A-METHYLNAPHTHALENE;FEMA 3193;1-methyl-naphthalen;femanumber3193;Methyl-1-naphthalene;Naphthalene,1-methyl-
Molecular Structure 1-Methylnaphthalene  90-12-0
Molecular Formula C11H10
Molecular Weight 142.2
mp: −22 ℃(lit.)
Hazard Codes: Details
Risk Statements: 22-36/37/38-42/43-51/53-39/23/24/25-23/24/25-20/21/22
Safety Statements: 7-26-36/37/39-61-45-36/37-23-36
RIDADR: UN 3082 9/PG 3
HS Code: 29029080

CAS 90-12-0 Wiki / 90-12-0 MSDS

1-Methylnaphthalene[1]
1-Methylnaphthalene.svg
1-Methylnaphthalene 3D.png
Names
IUPAC name
1-Methylnaphthalene
Other names
α-methylnaphthalene
Identifiers
CAS Number
  • 90-12-0 YesY
3D model (JSmol)
  • Interactive image
ChEBI
  • CHEBI:50717 YesY
ChemSpider
  • 6736 YesY
ECHA InfoCard 100.001.788
EC Number 201-966-8
KEGG
  • C14082 YesY
PubChem CID
  • 7002
Properties
Chemical formula
C11H10
Molar mass 142.20 g/mol
Appearance Liquid
Density 1.001 g/mL
Melting point −22 °C (−8 °F; 251 K)
Boiling point 240–243 °C (464–469 °F; 513–516 K)
Vapor pressure 4.91
Magnetic susceptibility (χ)
-102.8·10−6 cm3/mol
Hazards
R-phrases (outdated) R22 R42 R43
S-phrases (outdated) S7 S36 S37 S39
Flash point 82 °C (180 °F; 355 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

1-Methylnaphthalene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). It has a cetane number of zero, and was previously used as the lower reference for cetane number. However, due to the expense and handling difficulty of 1-methylnaphthalene, it was replaced in this capacity by isocetane, with a CN of 15.[2]

On February 22, 2014, NASA announced a greatly upgraded database[3][4] for detecting and monitoring PAHs, including 1-methylnaphthalene, in the universe. According to NASA scientists, over 20% of the carbon in the universe may be associated with PAHs, possible starting materials for the formation of life.[3] PAHs seem to have been formed shortly after the Big Bang, are abundant in the universe,[5][6][7] and are associated with new stars and exoplanets.[3]